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 Barney Fife Realty

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Barney Fife Realty

There were 677 single family homes on the market in the fourteen Lakes Region communities covered by this report as of November 1, 2019. The average asking price was $621,082 and the median asking price point came in at $349,900. On November 1, 2018 there were 712 homes on the market, the average asking price was $651,002 and the median price point was $339,900. The current inventory level represents a 7.8-month supply of homes on the market

Anyone can be a real esatate agentAnyone can be a real estate agent. Yup. Even Deputy Barney Fife. In Season 6 Episode 15 on the Andy Griffith Show which aired way back in 1965 Sheriff Andy Taylor comes into the P.D. to learn that Barney has taken on a new part time gig as a real estate agent. Andy asks, “Since when have you been in real estate?”

Barney says since he bumped into Mr. Summer, the real estate man, at the diner yesterday and he got him thinking. Barney explains to Andy that Mr. Summer just sits around his office all day smoking a big fat cigar and he never stirs until someone wants to buy something. Then he takes them out in that old rattle trap of a car of his and if they buy, he collects five percent.  Barney exclaims, “Well, has he got it made or has he got it made!”

Anyone can be a real esatate agentBarney brags he already has two deals cooking because he made ten phone calls last night, just kind of fishing in the dark, and he got two bites! Andy asks who and Barney says that the Clarks and the Mortensons both want bigger houses. He figures he is going to put the Clarks in the Mortensons’ house and the Mortensons in the Simms’ house if he can find them what they want.

Barney exclaims that he has “been in business less than twenty-four hours and he has learned something fantastic.”

Anyone can be a real esatate agentAndy asks, “What’s that?”

Barney replies that “Everyone wants to sell their house!” He expertly explains to Andy that nine out of ten people aren’t completely happy with the house they live in and would sell in a minute if someone gave them a little “nudge.”

Andy says as he sips on some coffee, “Well, I can tell you one fella that’s completely happy with the house he’s living in, and that’s me!”

Ever the consummate deal making professional, Barney coyly says “Ayup, what if I told you the Williams’ house was available?”

Andy responds, “You mean the big white house out on the highway with the big trees?”

Barney says, “Uh huh, the one you always point out to me when we drive by. Would you sell your house if I told you I could put you in the Williams’ house?” Andy asks how he knows if the Williams want to sell, to which Barney replies that he had called them last night and they said they would sell if they got the right price.

Andy shrugs and says “Oh, they probably want a whole lot!”

Barney zeroes in and says, “What if I told you I could put you in that little unit for $3,500?”

Andy replies unbelieving, “Your kidding, $3,500?!”

“Sure,” silver tongued Barney explains, “we can get $24,000 for your place, we can pick up the Williams for $27,500 and you can get a mortgage at the bank for the difference and pfftt! You’re in the Williams’ house!”

Andy starts giggling about this being such a far-fetched idea, but you can see he has been “nudged” appropriately. The hook, as they say, has been set.

Anyone can be a real esatate agentAndy goes home to find his son, Opie, trying to sell his bicycle to another kid named Tyler for five dollars. Tyler asks Andy if he thinks that’s a fair price. Andy asks if Opie had told him about the coaster brake slipping? Tyler says no, what about the coaster brake? Opie explains it doesn’t do it all the time. Andy then says that the chain is worn and keeps coming apart where it is wired together. Opie laments that all you gotta do is put another piece of wire in there. Andy also points out that the inner tubes are shot and covered with patches.

Tyler angrily says, “You haven’t told me any of this stuff!”

Opie indignantly responds, “You never asked!”

Tyler says, “So what, you should have told me anyway.”

Andy tells Opie that when you are selling something that the buyer has a right to know everything that’s wrong with it, otherwise it is not quite honest.

Opie tells Tyler he will let him have the bike for four dollars to which Tyler responds, “I wouldn’t take this hunk of junk if you gave it to me!”

So, we have learned some real estate from this tale so far. 1. Anyone can be a real estate agent. 2. Real estate agents don’t do much.  3.Everyone will sell their home if nudged properly. 4. And tell your buyer that the coaster brake doesn’t work all the time. More to come on this episode after next week’s Waterfront Report. Until then, don’t call Barney.

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The Porch Sitters on Staging

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The Porch Sitters on Staging

staging adviceThe Lakes Region Professional Porch Sitters Chapter 603 met this past week on the porch at Gordy Blaisdell’s house in Meredith. It was a fitting place to meet to discuss real estate issues and the upcoming deer hunting season as he resides out in the boonies on top of a mountain. We figured we might see a deer walk through his back yard whilst we imbibed on porch crawler beverages and chomped on venison jerky. Dirk Davenport, Bubba Gunter, Travis D. Coletrain, Little Stevie Prestone,  John “Leadbellie” Goode, and Rollie Rollins were all in attendance. It was a perfect autumn afternoon.

“I noticed you got a couple of nice buck heads hanging on your living room wall,” said Rollie as he plunked down on a rocker. Rollie is also an avid hunter and is always looking for another hunting spot to bag a big one. “Where did you shoot him?”

Not wanting to give up any info, Gordy replies, “In two places.” He grinned and continued, “You know I was thinking of selling this place down the road. Do you think I would need to take down the deer heads in order to sell? They look pretty good up there and they add lots of character!”

“You’re the character,” Bubba said. “I think you should take them down, so you don’t offend anyone and scare the kids.”

staging advice“They aren’t half as scary as the stuffed bear and beady-eyed little fox down in the game room.” Gordy replied. Just then a loud gunshot rang out making everyone jump. Then another and another.

“That’s just Jimbo down the road target practicing,” said Gordy. “This is a regular occurrence up here. If someone doesn’t like the deer heads, they’re sure not gonna like the shooting!”

This is New Hampshire, you know!” added Travis. “People should realize that they aren’t moving to the city. You get out just a little way from downtown anywhere around here and you’re likely to hear some gunshots.”

“Probably not as many as in Chicago though and at least here you know they aren’t shooting at other people,” added Dirk.

“Well,” Little Stevie pipes in, “You know the general rule of thumb is to get rid of all the clutter, personal collections, and family pictures if they are overwhelming. You want to stage the place so buyers can imagine they live there. “

staging advice“Yeah, but you know,” I said. “I’ve sold houses with all kinds of animal heads with no problem. Someone looking at this house, in this setting, might be more offended by a huge collection of creepy dolls looking back at them rather than a few deer heads?”

“Yeah,” added Leadbellie. “Tell your agent to ask if the buyer is from New Hampshire or if he is from NaHamsha. If he is from NaHamsha, you can leave the deer heads up. If he is from New Hampshire, take them down and put up one of those plush fabric moose heads.”

staging advice“Or, how about a Jackelope or two? They won’t know what to think,” Smiled Bubba. “I once had a guy that had a collection of hundreds of beer steins lining the walls in his family room. There was no way to take a good picture of the room.”

“Good photography is one of the most important things and I am not talking about the family photographs on the wall!” I said. “Sellers always ask about whether they need to take all the family photos down.  It’s all about taste. If you got walls covered with dozens and dozens of photos, it’s probably too much. A few here and there are OK, though.

“I guess you gotta take it on a case by case basis and see what your real estate agent advises,” said Gordy. “But I am not taking down my trophies!”

staging advice

 

Just then, as we suspected might happen, a big buck appeared at the far end of Gordy’s field. “You just come back in a couple of weeks now, ya’ hear,” Gordy whispered. “And I just might have three heads up there!”

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The Stigmatized House

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The Stigmatized House

There were 160 single family homes sold in September in the fourteen Lakes Region communities covered by this market report. The average sales price came in at $42,871 and the median price point stood at $318,250. That brings us to a total of 1,089 sales for the year at an average price of $422,733 compared to 1,062 sales at a price of $398,361 for the same period last year.

StigmatizedIn real estate lingo, the house at 43 Greenbriar Farm Rd in Laconia was one of those homes you would classify as a stigmatized property. This hundred-year-old property had a long and sordid reputation as being an extremely unlucky house to live in.

StigmatizedIt’s true, the son of the first owner of this 1920 vintage farmhouse died young, shortly before completing basic training in the Army in 1943. He jumped out of a plane at 10,000 feet and his parachute failed to open. He was eligible to be buried at Arlington National Cemetery, but the parents flatly refused. He was brought back home and was buried in the back yard. It’s a sad story, but that’s really hard to blame on the house.

Stigmatized

 

The second owners were a young couple with two little girls, Sally and Sara. It was apparently a very unhappy marriage and the neighbors reported lots of loud arguments, screaming, and sounds of glass breaking on a number of occasions. The cops were always there it seemed. This went on for a couple of years until one night late in October of 1972 when a single gunshot caused the neighbors to summon the police once again. The police arrived to find no one on the main living levels. They went down the dimly lit stairs to the basement to find the husband sitting in a chair at the far end of the basement next to the washer and dryer. His head was only partly there as a result of a gunshot wound. A 12-gauge pump action shotgun was lying on the floor beside him. It was never determined if this was a murder or suicide.  Sally, Sara, and their Mom were nowhere to be found and were never heard from or seen again.

StigmatizedThe third owner also met an untimely demise when the blender he was using to make his second pitcher of margaritas for the afternoon was knocked into the sink by a not so sober friend. Unfortunately, he was washing his hands in the sink to get barbecue sauce off his hands at the same time.  This was his last barbecue and it certainly was well done.

The current owner has now hired me to sell this run down, charming but rather tainted property. I know all this history because of the special investigation done by NH Chronicle and from the more intimate details now provided by the current owner. It turns out he only bought the place because he got it for a song at a tax sale.  He thought he could make some money on it. He had never seen the Chronicle TV show, but his neighbors were more than happy to fill him in on the grisly details after he purchased it. Neighbors are like that.

StigmatizedHe, by the way, has never really lived there. He spent just one night there and the strange noises kept him up all night. He said he thought he heard the rustling of a parachute, the muted whirring of a blender, and faint giggles and voices of little children. He realized the place really could be haunted and that his expected windfall when he sold could be minimal.

But he filled out the listing paperwork and disclosures. I informed him that if was going to represent him that I will inform any buyer about the property’s somewhat grisly history. There may not be a place on the seller’s property disclosure form for this kind of thing, but I certainly would want someone to tell me all about it if I were buying the place. He hedged a bit, worried about how this would affect the marketability and sales price. I told him not to worry, not everyone believes in ghosts.

I put the property in the MLS system, sent out flyers to all the agents in the area, advertised it in the local papers, and did a couple of open houses. We went three weeks without a showing. Then I got a call one morning from a lady that said she just got back to town after a long absence. She was looking for a home for her family and she said she knew the area. We scheduled a showing for that same afternoon.

I got to the house shortly before the appointed time and opened the blinds and curtains and turned on all the lights. As I was just finishing, a car pulled in and a young lady got out. I met her at the door and greeted her. I had her fill out the required Brokerage Relationship Disclosure forms and invited her to look around. She just kind of stood there and stared. She barely moved for a couple of minutes. I started to try and strike up a conversation when she suddenly raised her hand as if to tell me to be quiet. She asked, “What is that noise?” I took a deep breath and held it. I could hear the unmistakable, but barely audible sounds of ice rattling around in a blender…except there was no blender in the house. “It could be the pipes?” I said optimistically.

I told her that there were some things I needed to tell her about the history of the house. You know like the first owner’s son fell out of an airplane and is buried out back, that the second owner either was killed or committed suicide in the basement, and that the third owner was electrocuted by a run-a-way blender in the kitchen.

The young lady listened thoughtfully and asked if I thought the house was a good deal. I told her we had priced it to sell based on the fact that some people don’t want to buy a house where there have been violent deaths or murders and that some people believe the house could be haunted.

To my surprise she said, “I don’t believe in ghosts at all. If I can get a good deal on this place I will put in an offer. It feels like home. Let’s write it up!” She walked back to the front door and waived to whomever was in the car to come on in.

Somewhat stunned, I said “But ma’am, you haven’t even looked at the house yet. Don’t you want to see what it’s like?”

She turned back as her two young children came in the front door and said, “That’s OK it is not really necessary! This is Sally and Sara. We’ve seen this house before. Let’s write up the offer!

 

Stigmatized

Data compiled using the NEREN MLS system.

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South Down – Long Bay Sales Report September 2019

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South Down – Long Bay Sales Report September 2019

 

Data compiled unsing the NEREN MLS system

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Winni Waterfront Report September 2019

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Winni Waterfront Report September 2019

Winni Waterfront ReportThere were twelve Winnipesaukee waterfront sales in September 2019. The average sales price came in at $927,691 and the median price point was $692,500.

Winni Waterfront ReportThe entry level sale for the month was at 6 Keniston Island in Wolfeboro. This 1890’s vintage home is the quintessential gingerbread Winnipesaukee lake cottage. It has 953 square feet of living space, an open floor plan on the main level with the requisite wood burning fireplace and wood stove, and four bedrooms upstairs. Outside there is a fabulous front porch that is perfect for rocking and a bunk house for the kids to play in. The home sits on a .28-acre level lot with 103’ of frontage and an L-shaped dock. It was listed at $525,000 and sold for $344,000 after 59 days on the market.

Winni Waterfront ReportThe median price point representative this month is at 73 Cottage Rd in Moultonborough. This $1,899 million offering is a 3,800 square foot, three bed, four bath Adirondack that is under construction. It sold for just $750,000 which would lead one to believe that not much had been completed on the home. There are two lots of record with one lot across the street from the water that was intended for a three-car garage and leach field. The waterfront lot offer offers great views of the Ossipee Mountains and has 102’ of frontage.

Winni Waterfront ReportThe highest sale for the month was at 27 Pine Needle Lane which is in the prestigious Bald Peak Club in Moultonborough. This is a 1950’s vintage ranch with 3,849 square feet of space, four bedrooms, four and a half baths that sits on a very private 2.78-acre lot with 300’ of frontage and fabulous sunset views. This property never actually hit the market but was sold for $2.5 million. There is little information or pictures shown in the MLS to expand on, but with what little is shown it is apparent that the home had undergone extensive upgrades and renovations since it was purchased in 2013.

Winni Waterfront ReportThe big news for the month is that there were seven sales on Lake Winnisquam! That brings the total number of sales on the lake to twenty for the year thus far. The entry level property sold at an even $400,000 and is located at 834 Laconia Rd in Tilton. This 3,886 square foot, five-bedroom home was built in 1907. It sits on a shared lot across the street from Winnisquam with other smaller cottages but was sold with 90’ of owned frontage and its own dock.

Winni Waterfront ReportThe median price home was at 47 Lower Smith Rd in Sanbornton. This is a 1920’s vintage, three-bedroom, two bath year-round home with 1,962 square feet of living space. This home is literally right on the water on a .31-acre lot with 70’ of frontage and offers amazing broad views of the lake. It was listed at $699,000 and sold for $625,000 in just eleven days.

Winni Waterfront ReportThe highest sale for the month was a few doors down at 58 Lower Smith Rd. This is another vintage, but seasonal, cottage built in 1940. It has an adorable and rustic 870 square feet of space so you won’t get lost…unless you are out on the screened front porch where you will definitely be lost in the amazing waterfront view. There are two bedrooms, one and a half baths, and an outdoor shower. It is pretty near perfect to me and I hope it stays that way. It sits on a 1.3-acre lot with 150 of frontage. The property was listed at $749,000 and sold for $675,000 in ten days.

I’ve added the shore front footage to our waterfront charts this month. Obviously, a lot of the value of a waterfront home is in that precious frontage on the water so you’ll be able to easily compare it now!

Winni Waterfront Report

Winni Waterfront Report

Data compiled using the NEREN MLS System

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Parade Craze

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Parade Craze

There were 800 single family residential homes listed as of October 1, 2019 in the fourteen  Lakes Region communities covered by this real estate market report. Those are the towns in Belknap County plus the lakeside communities of Moultonborough, Tuftonboro, and Wolfeboro. The average asking price was $632,047 and the median price point was $349,900. This inventory level represents about a 6.6-month supply of homes on the market.

Parade CrazeThe annual Lakes Region Parade of Homes is fast approaching. This self-guided tour is run by the Lakes Region Builders and Remodelers Association, which is a non-profit, professional trade association and part of the National Association of Home Builders. The Parade of Homes features only the very best builders in the Lakes Region and showcases their finest work during a three-day tour on Columbus Day Weekend, October 12, 13, and 14th.  This year there are eleven newly constructed or remodeled properties on the Parade of Homes tour that can provide you with lots of ideas and inspiration for your next home or project.

Parade of homesThe cost to go on the tour is only $20 per person with children free. Tickets for the Parade of Homes can be purchased at the first house you visit or through the Parade Craze app which you can download at the Apple App Store or Google Play Store. You’ll be able to view photos and information about the builders and their homes. There is also a map and Google directions to each property, so you won’t get lost.

You can learn more about the Parade of Homes by going to the Lakes Region Builders and Remodelers website at www.lakesregionbuilders.com. And, if you happen to be looking for a contractor, home product supplier, architect, plumber, interior designer, or just about anything else to do with a home you can find a qualified member right there to do your work or supply you with what you need. Why there’s even a real estate agent or two to help you find a new home if you want! The complete list of association members is located under the “Visitor” tab at the top of the page.

You should also check out the National Association of Home Builders’ website (www. nahb.org) if you are thinking of buying a home and even if you already own one. Click on the “Consumer” tab at the top of the page and it will take you to a wealth of information. Here you will find a menu that includes; Home Buying 101, Home Maintenance and Repair, Remodeling Your Home,  and Find a Home Remodeler.

Here you can find a home buying guide, advice on financing your first home and information about closing on a property. There are articles about the tax benefits of owning a home, the benefits of owning a newly built home, as well as articles about log homes, timber frame and panelized homes. There are tips on remodeling, painting, home maintenance and how to find a qualified contractor to do your remodeling job. It’s a great resource so check it out!

So, come check out the Parade of Homes on Columbus Day weekend. You’ll be glad you did!

Data compiled using the NEREN MlS system.

Parde of homes

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South Down – Long Bay Sales August 2019

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South Down – Long Bay Sales August 2019

South Down

 

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A Household Quiz

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A Household Quiz

It’s time for another real estate related quiz centering around some common and otherwise once common household items.

  1. What did John Crapper invent in the late 19th century? A. The toilet B. The ballcock C. The shuttlecock D. The petcock  quiz
  2. A threshold was meant to: A. compensate for uneven flooring B. Keep straw in the house C. Trip Indians
  3. What did Henry Seeley invent in the 1820’s” A. The steam iron B. The vacuum cleaner C. the modern mattress D. The radiator
  4. Who invented the air conditioner? A. Bill Rheem B. George Westinghouse   C. LL Cool J    D. Willis Carrier
  5. Who invented the first radiator? A. Frans San Galli B. Franz Ferdinand   C. Franz Schubert D. Dennis Franz
  6. ozzieThe first patent for a doorknob was applied for in 1878. Who applied for that patent? Osbourn Dorsey B. Thomas Dorsey    C. Thomas Edison   D. Ozzie Osbourne
  7. Speaking of Thomas Edison, where was the first house in America to be electrified by a centrally located power plant? Detroit, Michigan B. Appleton,  Wisconsin   C. Menlo Park, NJ   D. Portsmouth, NH
  8. An oilcloth is: A. a way to protect your carpets while painting   B. used to wipe kerosene lamps off   C. used to make torches   D. a precursor to linoleum
  9. Tin ceilings were originally used because: A. they were cheaper than plaster B. they were attractive                     C. they were easy to clean   D. they last longer than plaster
  10. What item used on battleships made its way into just about every home? A. portholes B. smoke detectors   C. linoleum   D. fuses

quiz

 

Answers: 1. No, he didn’t invent the toilet. He invented the ballcock that goes inside it. 2. A threshold originally was used to keep the straw covering a dirt floor inside the house.   3. Henry Seeley invented the steam iron. 4. Willis Carrier invented the modern air conditioner. 5. Frans San Galli received a patent on the first steam radiator in 1857 in Russia. 6. No, not Ozzie Osbourne, it was Osbourn Dorsey. 7. Appleton, Wis. 8. A precursor to linoleum.  9. A, B, C, & D All correct    10. Linoleum

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The House of Horrors with Formal Dining Room and Brick

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The House of Horrors with Formal Dining Room and Brick

There were 149 single family residential homes sold in August in the Lakes Region communities covered by this report. The average sales price came in at $410,095 and the median price point was $275,000.

cheersWith little new on TV worth watching today, I have started to watch the reruns of Cheers. I figured it will take me awhile to get through the 275 episodes that ran from September 30, 1982, to May 20, 1993. I am making good progress. I am up to season six already. For those too young to remember or haven’t seen this hilarious show, it is was based on the now famous Boston drinking establishment named Cheers and its many wacky characters. The early seasons starred Ted Danson as Sam the skirt chasing owner of the bar, Shelley Long as Diane who is Sam’s on again-off again girlfriend and waitress, Rhea Perlman as Carla who is another waitress and single mother of six, Woody Harrelson as Woody the bartender who just fell off the turnip truck from the midwest, George Wendt as Norm the owner of the corner seat at the bar, John Ratzenberger as Cliff, a Postal Deliveryman and know-it-all of the bar, and Kelsie Grammar as the self-aggrandizing psychiatrist Frasier Crane.

It seems like that sooner or later in every TV series there is an episode about home ownership. In Cheers, it showed up in Season 5 Episode 5 as the The House of Horrors with Formal Dining Room and Brick. There are real estate lessons to be learned as well as mistakes that would give any real estate agent heartburn…but you know, it really is just a TV show.

The real estate story-line starts with Norm asking, “Hey Carla, how’s that house hunting going, huh?” She promptly stuffs Norm’s tie in his mouth and says, “Does that answer your question?!” This is an absolutely normal everyday reaction from any buyer that has been looking for over three months for a home .

She complains to Cliff and Sam that it is hopeless, that she has looked everywhere in the Boston area for something she can afford but can’t find anything in her price range…and this is like in 1986. She says she has been scrimping and saving and has finally got enough money so that she could buy a house but now there is nothing she can afford. That sounds familiar, too!

cheersCliff then arrives after his appointed rounds and excitedly tells everyone about his new postal route in Meadowview Acres. He claims it is one of the best routes in the city. Carla comes up to the bar to order some drinks and Cliff tells her that if she is still looking for a house that he has found a real “doozy” for her on his new route. He hands her a paper with all the particulars and she can’t believe the low, low price. She knows how nice the area is, so she says, “The house is either built on quicksand or is currently on fire!” Cliff assures her that no, no, it’s a nice house and that he checked it out.

Sam tells Carla she should go look at it, pointing out to her that her horoscope today said to “explore other avenues.” Since Carla is a superstitious nut cake and because the horoscope aligned with her Tarot cards reading she decides it would be a good idea to check it out. Off she goes. This is another fine example using the stars to find your dream home. No real estate agent needed here.

Carla returns all excited that she got to see the house and says it was “perfect!” She says that she and her older kids can all have their own rooms, that it has a big kitchen with Formica for as “far as the eye can see” and even a lawn that she can lie naked on. She says there is even a fireplace. “Finally, the kids are gonna have a place where they are supposed to start a fire.” Diane comments that, “You’re talking like you already bought the place.” To which Carla responds, “I did! My first offer went through without a hitch… they knew I was a tough negotiator.” Imagine that!

cheersNorm shows up and is surprised to hear that Carla had already bought the house. He had done some checking to find out why the house was so cheap and learned that it was built over a seventeenth century prison…and not just any prison, it held only the worst murderers and prisoners of that time. Legend has it that they will rise from the dead to take revenge on whoever is living in the house! Now they are afraid Carla will freak out when she finds out why the house was so cheap, but they reluctantly decide they must tell Carla the truth. Instead of having a melt-down, she says “Oh, I thought you were going to tell me it had dry rot.” Seems like Carla should have had an agent to do some due diligence. I wonder if there were any property disclosures? Ahh, this is just TV…

After a while, everyone at the bar learns that Carla has never moved into the house because she is scared to death. She says there is something cold and clammy there and the house doesn’t want her in it. They encourage her to confront her fears and suggest that if she could spend just one night in the house, she’d see there was nothing to it at all. She says, “I’ve never been a quitter. I’m going to spend tonight in that house.”

Carla creeps into her new home with a wooden cross poised to protect her from the evil within. After fumbling a bit to turn on the lights there is a knock on the door and Cliff and Norm enter with beer and pizza. They feel obligated to stay through the night with her. Norm sits on the floor and starts munching on the pizza. The telephone rings…no, not a cell phone…this is 1986. It is Norm’s wife telling Carla that he must come home. This is the perfect opportunity for him to skedaddle and he takes it.

So, it is just Carla and Cliff at the house and after some bickering that turns into dance lessons for Cliff (I’ll let you watch the episode for the romantic scene.) Eventually, they fall asleep and awake to find it is early morning. Carla is ecstatic that she has made it through the night without any demonic visitors. Just then the house starts shaking, bright lights come in through the windows, and there is a roaring and howling sound from the gates of hell. Carla jumps into Cliff’s arms and screams. Looking to the heavens, Cliff realizes that there are not demons coming up out of the graves to get them but that this is the sound of an L1110 wide-body taking off from Logan… “the sounds are very similar,” he says. Carla jumps down and says to Cliff, “You mean that this house, my house, is at the end of a runway?” Cliff starts shaking. She continues, “And that was a wide-body jet trying to hit me from my backyard? And, that this house is not cheap because it is haunted, but because it is right next to the airport?” Cliff mumbles, “Uh-huhhh…” Carla yells gladly, “I’M HOME!!”

Morals of the story; 1. There is a good, logical reason why a house might be so cheap and 2. If you are buying a house…get an agent.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Data compiled using the NEREN MLS system

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The Winni Waterfront Report – August 2019

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The Winni Waterfront Report – August 2019

There were fourteen waterfront sales on Lake Winnipesaukee in August 2019. The average sales price came in at $1,380,464 and the median price point was $947,000.

winni salesIt is not surprising that another Rattlesnake Island property in Alton led the way as the entry level sale of the month! Do you think the turnover out there is because of all the rattlesnakes? Nah, it’s just that there are a lot of properties, so you are bound to have some turnover. 182 Rattlesnake Island is a 996 square foot, three-bedroom cottage built in 1990. The open concept main level has new hardwood floors, natural woodwork, hardwood flooring, a cathedral ceiling, and wood stove. The second level has two bedrooms, one of which has a private deck, and the third level has a sleeping loft. There is a huge front deck, plus another down by the water to enjoy the views from. The cottage sits on a .76-acre lot with 152’ of frontage. It was listed at $395,000 and sold for $380,000 after 59 days on the market.

winni reportThe median price point representative this month is at 70 Terrace Hill Road in Gilford. This 1,449 square foot shingle style year-round home was built in 1939 and has that charming old lake cottage feel with knotty pine walls and hardwood floors.  The main level features a vaulted ceiling great room with a gas fireplace and stunning broad views of the lake, an eat in kitchen, two bedrooms, and a fantastic screened porch. Upstairs is an additional bedroom and there also is a one-bedroom guest cottage for the in-laws! The home sits on a .54-acre lot with a rolling lawn, 100’ of frontage, a water side deck, sandy beach, and dock with breakwater. It took only five days to find a buyer at the asking price of $969,000. Someone thought it was just perfect!

Cattle LandingThe highest sale on the lake was a newly constructed Adirondack home at 124 Cattle Landing Road in Meredith. It has 6,504 square feet of luxurious living space, with five bedrooms including the first-floor master suite, five and a half baths, a gourmet kitchen, great room with cathedral ceiling and fieldstone fireplace, a wrap around porch, and a three-car garage. It sits on a one-acre lot with 184’ of sugar sand beach and beautiful southeasterly views. It was listed at $3.995 million and sold for $3.8 million.

winni reportThere were two sales on Lake Winnisquam in August.  The home at 565B Laconia Rd in Tilton that was listed at $849,000 sold for $810,000 after 44 days on the market. This unique 2,000 square foot home was built in 1990 and was constructed right on the water over an existing boat house, so you literally park your boat in the basement!  The home is in mint condition and has three bedrooms, three baths, an open concept living/dining area with hardwood floors, a second level deck with a screened porch underneath, and great views up the lake. winni reportThe home sits on a 1.07-acre lot with 140’ of frontage, a sandy beach, additional dock, and lakeside patio. The other sale was at 85 Tucker Shore Rd in Belmont. This 2,598 square foot colonial style home was built in 1996 but has been totally renovated. There are four bedrooms, four bathrooms, an open concept main level with tile and hardwood flooring, and an eat in kitchen with stainless steel appliances. The house sits on a level .32-acre lot with 140’ of sandy frontage and has a new 50’ dock. It was listed at $879,000 and sold for $825,000 after 35 days on the market.

 

Data compiled using the NEREN MLS system

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